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Posts Tagged ‘Sir Coutts Lindsay’

At the time of the construction of this terrace it was still relatively on the edge of town, overlooking the playing fields of St Paul’s School. The site was also close to the marshy Thameside village of Hammersmith and close to the part of the Fulham distinguished by the residency of Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898) in the Grange, North End Road, since demolished. St. Paul’s Studios were built besides a previous large studio-house containing a number of studios, built in 1885 for Sir Coutts Lindsay Bt (1824-1913) founder of the Grosvenor Gallery. Used by a number of a 19th century painters it is interesting to note that Edward Burne-Jones worked on Arthur at Avalon in this studio in 1897-8.

Last Sleep of Arthur in Avalon

Last Sleep of Arthur in Avalon

Immersed in his work, Burne-Jones identified himself with Arthur and even adopted Arthur’s pose when he himself slept. By 1885, four years into his work the association with Arthur reached the point where Burne-Jones had to ask his patron George Howard, 9th Earl of Carlisle to cancel or revise his original commission, replacing the grand scene with a smaller painting focused on the departed king. Howard agreed to cancellation and never requested his downpayment back. Nevertheless, Burne-Jones returned to the original grand painting, and worked on it for the remaining thirteen years of his life. The studio was also occupied by his son Philip and in 1912-14 Frank Brangwyn R.A. (1867-1956) used them while working on a large-scale project. Brangwyn himself lived close by in Hammersmith, on Queen Caroline Street.

At the same time as the St. Paul’s Studios were constructed in 1891, C.F.A.Voysey – possibly the finest Arts & Crafts designer and architect – designed an interesting studio house, built just around the corner at 17 St. Dunstan’s Road, for W.E.F.Brittan (1848-1816) the decorative painter.

Studio House in St Dunstan's Road

Studio House in St Dunstan's Road

There are other late nineteenth century studio-houses in Margrave Road and Avonmore Road showing off the artistic activity in this area in the early 20th century.  One of note is the Fulham Glass House, 1906, a workshop and studios for stained glass design, built on Lettice Street off the Fulham Road, for Lowndes and Drury with whom Christopher Whall was closely associated – he himself living in Ravenscourt Park.

The Fall of Man

The Fall of Man

The series of window installed by Whall in the Lady Chapel, part of Cloucester Cathedral, between 1899 and 1913 is widely acknowledged to be the finest glass of the period in England.

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